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  Think Big – Now Think Even Bigger
  Join Us at Internet of Things at Cloud Expo, November 11-13,
at the Javits Center!


The Internet of Things (IoT) is the most profound change in personal and enterprise IT since the creation of the Worldwide Web more than 20 years ago.

All major researchers estimate there will be tens of billions devices - computers, smartphones, tablets, and sensors - connected to the Internet by 2020. This number will continue to grow at a rapid pace for the next several decades.

With major technology companies and startups seriously embracing IoT strategies, now is the perfect time to attend Internet of Things at Cloud Expo in New York City. Learn what is going on, contribute to the discussions, and ensure that your enterprise is as "IoT-Ready" as it can be!

Delegates to Internet of Things at Cloud Expo will be able to attend eight separate, information-packed tracks:

  • Enterprise Cloud
  • Digital Transformation
  • The API Enterprise | Mobility & Security
  • DevOps | Containers & Microservices
  • Cognitive Computing | AI, ML, DL
  • Big Data | Analytics
  • IoT | IIoT | Smart Cities
  • Hot Topics | FinTech | WebRTC

There are 120 breakout sessions in all, with Keynotes, General Sessions, and Power Panels adding to three days of incredibly rich presentations and content.


We'll see you in New York!



Day 3 Keynote at @ThingsExpo | Chris Matthieu, CTO of Octoblu
In his keynote at @ThingsExpo, Chris Matthieu, Director of IoT Engineering at Citrix and co-founder and CTO of Octoblu, focused on building an IoT platform and company. He provided a behind-the-scenes look at Octoblu's platform, business, and pivots along the way (including the Citrix acquisition of Octoblu).
  Themes & Topics to Be Discussed

Consumer IoT
• Wearables
• Smart Appliances
• Smart Cars
• Smartphones 2.0
• Automation
• Smart Travel
• Personal Fitness
• Health Care
• Personalized Marketing
• Customized Shopping
• Personal Finance
• The Digital Divide
• Mobile Cash & Markets
• Games & The IoT
• The Future of Education
• Virtual Reality

Enterprise IoT
• The Business Case for
x IoT
• Smart Grids
• Smart Cities
• Smart Transportation
• The Smart Home
• M2M
• Authentication/Security
• Wiring the IoT
• The Internet of
x Everything
• Digital Transformation
x of Enterprise IT
• Agriculture
• Transportation
• Manufacturing
• Local & State
x Government
• Federal Government

IoT Developers | WebRTC Summit
• Eclipse Foundation
• Cloud Foundry
• Linux Containers
• Node-Red
• Open Source Hardware
• Ajax and the IoT
• Leveraging SOA
• Multi-Cloud IoT
• Evolving Standards
• WebSockets
• Security & Privacy
x Protocols
• GPS & Proximity
x Services
• Bluetooth/RFID/etc
• XMPP
• Nest Labs



The Top Keynotes, the Best Sessions, a Rock Star Faculty and the Most Qualified Delegates of ANY Internet of Things Event!


The future of computing lies in these things. As computing takes a much more active role in our lives it will at the same time become much more invisible. Internet of Things Expo will address the challenges in getting from where we are today to this future.
 
The high-energy event is a must-attend for senior technologists from CEOs on down – including CIOs, CTOs, directors of infrastructure, VPs of technology, IT directors and managers, network and storage managers, network engineers, enterprise architects, and communications and networking specialists.




@ThingsExpo Power Panel | The World's Many IoTs: Which Are the Most Important?
The Internet of Things is clearly many things: data collection and analytics, wearables, Smart Grids and Smart Cities, the Industrial Internet, and more. Cool platforms like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Intel's Galileo and Edison, and a diverse world of sensors are making the IoT a great toy box for developers in all these areas. In this Power Panel at @ThingsExpo, panelists discussed what things are the most important, which will have the most profound effect on the world, and what should we expect to see over the next couple of years.
Benefits of Attending the Three-Day Technical Program
  LEARNexactly why Internet of Things is relevant today from an economic, business and technology standpoint.
  HEAR first-hand from industry experts the common issues and requirements for creating a platform for the Internet of Things.
  SEE what new tools and approaches the Internet of Things requires.
  DISCOVER how to drive a distributed approach to the Internet of Things, where applications move to the data.
  FIND OUThow the vast volumes of new data produced by the Internet of Things provides a valuable new source of business insight through advanced analytical techniques.
  MASTER how the ongoing development of smart cities, cars, and houses will enhance connectivity infrastructure.
Lunch Power Panel | Microservices & IoT- Moderated by Jason Bloomberg
In this Power Panel at @DevOpsSummit, moderated by Jason Bloomberg, president of Intellyx, panelists Roberto Medrano, Executive Vice President at Akana; Lori MacVittie, Evangelist for F5 Networks; and Troy Topnik, ActiveState's Technical Product Manager; and Otis Gospodnetic, founder of Sematext; peeled away the buzz and discuss the important architectural principles behind implementing IoT solutions for the enterprise. As remote IoT devices and sensors become increasingly intelligent, they become part of our distributed cloud environment, and we must architect and code accordingly. At the very least, you'll have no problem filling in your buzzword bingo cards.


Book Review | Peopleware: Productive Projects and Teams (3rd Edition)
The most honest and accurate view of software management today.

The main goal of this review is to highlight parts of the book and provide a personal experience that relates to them. This entire book is made of real world scenarios, but I will only be able to hit a few in a review. I have had the opportunity to be on many different types of projects during my career. I have been on a project where it was just me and a steering committee, projects that involved several teams around the world, and on teams ranging from 1 other developer to over 30. The one common thread through all these projects is that the highest risk was the people on the project.

With the rapid speed at which technology is changing I have found only one way to ensure it works as advertised, Proof of Concepts. The same holds true of my development teams when I have no history with them. With the rapidly changing skill sets out there today, there is only one way to ensure your team has what it takes, Proof of Concept (POC) them.

Proof of Concepts (POC) plays an important role in not only testing your choice of technology and architecture, but of your development team as well. There is no doubt that people are nowhere close to being as predictable as software components. Software components are lucky; they don’t have emotions or free will. It is however fairly easy to read a person’s skill levels when what they are making has a predictable outcome.

One of my projects were I POC'd my team we were using the Composite UI Application Block (CAB) from Microsoft’s pattern & practices group. I had 3 developers on the team. Each was given an equal workload which included building a complete smart client module from the UI to the DB. The technology proof of concept had already been done at this point, so I knew the technology worked as advertise. The first iteration of development was a POC of the development team and of the framework’s architecture. We learned within a week that the team members had very different levels of ability.

One of them was able to code all the layers of the application including the DB level, but didn’t like UI work. One was only able to develop the UI forms, and was able to lay them out well. The other was dangerous in a team environment and was locked out of source safe. The dangerous developer worked on the Help documentation, configuring servers, and did a lot of testing.

The initial plan was completely scrapped, which was to have them build complete smart client modules from the UI to the DB, and the new assignments were made. We hit every estimate. If we had not POC’d the development team, we would have delivered buggy late code with each iteration.

The point is that no matter how well you architect a solution, or think you have a bullet proof software development process in place, people can unravel your project every time if you don't know how to manage them and their environment. To be able to effectively manage them you must understand the skill set they are bringing to the project. This book can help you do that and much more.

I have listed the parts below, but have not included the chapters because many of the titles don't make sense until you read the chapter.

Part I: Managing the Human Resource
Part II: The Office Environment
Part III: The Right People
Part IV: Growing Productive Teams
Part V: Fertile Soil
Part VI: It’s Supposed to Be Fun to Work Here

This book not only helps you manage and work with others, it also offers a lot of advice that helps balance work and home life. It shines light on the workaholic and how everyone has a bout of it now and then.

One of my favorite topics is undertime. Management thinks they are getting away with overtime, but the balanced (not a workaholic) always puts in as much undertime as they do overtime.

One of my mantras for successfully delivering what your business users need, versus what they think they want, is that you are going to have to lie to them at some point in the process. The lie may just be withholding information, but if you want to deliver a quality product, you're going to have to keep that bit of information from them. They are all too willing to sacrifice quality for quantity or perceived time to market.

This book explains why the builders should control quality levels. I agree, and when I can get away with it, I don't ask them if I can control it, I just do. Most of my clients I have worked for have no idea that I do 80% architecture, research, coding proof of concepts, requirements documentation, architectural synthesis, and design, and only spend 20% of my time doing the construction coding. Construction coding builds the modules on the framework I put in place during the 80% activities.

If they found out, they would want me to just start coding. If I did that, I would be like most places I have seen that do 20% analysis, 80% coding, and another 30% rework. They are always over budget and never meet their fictional timelines. I hate documentation, but it makes me present the project in a form that elicits the problems I would run into coding before I am into deep to make architectural changes.

I did have one client find out. He literally sent me an email that had the subject line of "I am paying you to code not think". A year or so after we successfully delivered on time and within budget and rolled off the project, I found out he was called into the board of his organization and was fired for incompetency and hiding the ramifications of his poor decisions from the board.

Like I said above, this book does an excellent job of explaining why the quality level of a product should be left up to the builder. I also like the idea the book mentions about the builder's veto power. I would love to have veto power over marketing and the business owners with respect to releasing a product. All too often I have seen premature releases that are accompanied by a nice long known issues list.

The book really covers working environments in great detail. Since I left the electronic engineering field I have not had an office with a door except at my home office. I have sat at tables where all the printers were for the office. The printing noise wasn't bad, but the people standing around talking, waiting for the slow printers, was a problem.

At work I am in a cube that is noisy 25% to 75% of a given day. I share it with one of the main application support guys on our team, and he often has a line waiting to see him. While they wait I am an open target for them to kill the wait time talking to me. To help a little bit I turn off my phone's ringer. Company policy is to always answer your phone, but 90% of the calls I get are salesmen calling about a product I needed to research.

Another thing about the office is they keep it hot in the winter and hot in the summer. They keep it around 76-78F, but I have seen the temperature at a screaming 82F. I have to keep a fan blowing on me and by the end of every week my eyes are wind burnt and bloodshot. My chair I have at work has me going to the chiropractor. They were going to buy us new chairs, but discovered they were too expensive, and we aren't allowed to bring our own chair in.

I work from home on Mondays. My home desk provides me twice the area I have at work. I have the room at a cool 68F. I have a great ergonomic chair. If I get a call I can put it on speaker phone, instead of having to hold it to my ear with my shoulder.

Context switching is always a big problem. The book refers to it as no-flow time. The book calls the state of being in deep thought and cranking through code or documentation 'Flow'. On average I would estimate I get 20 - 80% more work done on Mondays than any other day of the week because I have the isolated environment I need to think. To get hold of me people IM, email, or call if needed, but I can queue them until I am done with what I am working on. At the office if you don't answer right away they come to your cube and interrupt your thoughts.

I was once on a team that hired a tech writer that could not write technical documents. He could not even proof ours which was his main assignment. He would replace technical terms with terms he thought should be there and it would completely destroy the document. He soon had no work to do. This was a government team so they were not going to replace him anytime soon.

He started filling his day by popping into our team's cubes and just started talking. By the end of the first week of that I took him into a room and used the white board to draw the architecture I was working on. I numbered the locations of changes that needed to be changed for a user interface change and data that accompanied that change. There were about 6 or 7 places. I described what was happening in each place, and that all those places were being thought of at the same time. I told him every time he comes into our cubes to just talk, he erases everything we had queued up in our brains to make the changes. I explained that we had to take anywhere from 15 minutes to 45 minutes, depending on the complexity of the change to get back to work. He understood and stopped making rounds to our cubes.

The very next team meeting our manager said he wants to see more collaboration and he wants us to be visiting each other in our cubes more often to make that happen. The tech writer and I just busted out laughing. I then had to explain the same thing to the manager. Luckily he got it too.

Like I said at the beginning of this review, my main goal of was to highlight parts of the book and provide a personal experience that relates to them. I could continue that, and probably have my own book by the time I was done, but I will stop here. Everything in this book touches on the real world experiences we have as software architects, project managers, developers, CTOs, and CIOs.

If you are an IT manager, this is mandatory reading. If I ever find myself in a position of hiring IT managers, my first and maybe last question will be "Have you read Peopleware?"

If you are considering going into the software world, you must read this book first. It will help you have the right expectations of what you will find there. If you are already in the software world, this book will help you understand why things are the way they are and help you to potentially change them.

Peopleware: Productive Projects and Teams (3rd Edition)

About Tad Anderson
Tad Anderson has been doing Software Architecture for 18 years and Enterprise Architecture for the past few.

Presentation Slides
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Using new techniques of information modeling, indexing, and processing, new cloud-based systems can support cloud-based workloads previously...
IoT & Smart Cities Stories
Cloud-enabled transformation has evolved from cost saving measure to business innovation strategy -- one that combines the cloud with cognitive capabilities to drive market disruption. Learn how you can achieve the insight and agility you need to gain a competitive advantage. Industry-acclaimed CTO and cloud expert, Shankar Kalyana presents. Only the most exceptional IBMers are appointed with the rare distinction of IBM Fellow, the highest technical honor in the company. Shankar has also receive...
Enterprises have taken advantage of IoT to achieve important revenue and cost advantages. What is less apparent is how incumbent enterprises operating at scale have, following success with IoT, built analytic, operations management and software development capabilities - ranging from autonomous vehicles to manageable robotics installations. They have embraced these capabilities as if they were Silicon Valley startups.
DXWorldEXPO LLC announced today that Telecom Reseller has been named "Media Sponsor" of CloudEXPO | DXWorldEXPO 2018 New York, which will take place on November 11-13, 2018 in New York City, NY. Telecom Reseller reports on Unified Communications, UCaaS, BPaaS for enterprise and SMBs. They report extensively on both customer premises based solutions such as IP-PBX as well as cloud based and hosted platforms.
In his keynote at 18th Cloud Expo, Andrew Keys, Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise, will provide an overview of the evolution of the Internet and the Database and the future of their combination – the Blockchain. Andrew Keys is Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise. He comes to ConsenSys Enterprise with capital markets, technology and entrepreneurial experience. Previously, he worked for UBS investment bank in equities analysis. Later, he was responsible for the creation and distribution of life ...
Chris Matthieu is the President & CEO of Computes, inc. He brings 30 years of experience in development and launches of disruptive technologies to create new market opportunities as well as enhance enterprise product portfolios with emerging technologies. His most recent venture was Octoblu, a cross-protocol Internet of Things (IoT) mesh network platform, acquired by Citrix. Prior to co-founding Octoblu, Chris was founder of Nodester, an open-source Node.JS PaaS which was acquired by AppFog and ...
The Founder of NostaLab and a member of the Google Health Advisory Board, John is a unique combination of strategic thinker, marketer and entrepreneur. His career was built on the "science of advertising" combining strategy, creativity and marketing for industry-leading results. Combined with his ability to communicate complicated scientific concepts in a way that consumers and scientists alike can appreciate, John is a sought-after speaker for conferences on the forefront of healthcare science,...
"The Striim platform is a full end-to-end streaming integration and analytics platform that is middleware that covers a lot of different use cases," explained Steve Wilkes, Founder and CTO at Striim, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 20th Cloud Expo, held June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
The deluge of IoT sensor data collected from connected devices and the powerful AI required to make that data actionable are giving rise to a hybrid ecosystem in which cloud, on-prem and edge processes become interweaved. Attendees will learn how emerging composable infrastructure solutions deliver the adaptive architecture needed to manage this new data reality. Machine learning algorithms can better anticipate data storms and automate resources to support surges, including fully scalable GPU-c...
Predicting the future has never been more challenging - not because of the lack of data but because of the flood of ungoverned and risk laden information. Microsoft states that 2.5 exabytes of data are created every day. Expectations and reliance on data are being pushed to the limits, as demands around hybrid options continue to grow.
Dion Hinchcliffe is an internationally recognized digital expert, bestselling book author, frequent keynote speaker, analyst, futurist, and transformation expert based in Washington, DC. He is currently Chief Strategy Officer at the industry-leading digital strategy and online community solutions firm, 7Summits.



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012
Testimonials
This week I had the pleasure of delivering the opening keynote at Cloud Expo New York. It was amazing to be back in the great city of New York with thousands of cloud enthusiasts eager to learn about the next step on their journey to embracing a cloud-first worldl."
@SteveMar_Msft
 
How does Cloud Expo do it every year? Another INCREDIBLE show - our heads are spinning - so fun and informative."
@SOASoftwareInc
 
Thank you @ThingsExpo for such a great event. All of the people we met over the past three days makes us confident IoT has a bright future."
@Cnnct2me
 
One of the best conferences we have attended in a while. Great job, Cloud Expo team! Keep it going."

@Flexential


Who Should Attend?
Senior Technologists including CIOs, CTOs & Vps of Technology, Chief Systems Engineers, IT Directors and Managers, Network and Storage Managers, Enterprise Architects, Communications and Networking Specialists, Directors of Infrastructure.

Business Executives including CEOs, CMOs, & CIOs , Presidents & SVPs, Directors of Business Development , Directors of IT Operations, Product and Purchasing Managers, IT Managers.

Join Us as a Media Partner - Together We Can Enable the Digital Transformation!
SYS-CON Media has a flourishing Media Partner program in which mutually beneficial promotion and benefits are arranged between our own leading Enterprise IT portals and events and those of our partners.

If you would like to participate, please provide us with details of your website/s and event/s or your organization and please include basic audience demographics as well as relevant metrics such as ave. page views per month.

To get involved, email events@sys-con.com.

@ThingsExpo Blogs
Cloud-enabled transformation has evolved from cost saving measure to business innovation strategy -- one that combines the cloud with cognitive capabilities to drive market disruption. Learn how you can achieve the insight and agility you need to gain a competitive advantage. Industry-acclaimed CTO and cloud expert, Shankar Kalyana presents. Only the most exceptional IBMers are appointed with the rare distinction of IBM Fellow, the highest technical honor in the company. Shankar has also received the prestigious Outstanding Technical Achievement Award three times - an accomplishment befitting ...
My discussions with organizations looking to “digitally transform” themselves is yielding some interesting observations. I expect that when these discussions move into the execution phase, we will start to create some “Laws of Digital Transformation” that will guide organizations digital transformation journey. So with that in mind, let me start by proposing these “4 Laws of Digital Transformation.”
In his keynote at 18th Cloud Expo, Andrew Keys, Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise, will provide an overview of the evolution of the Internet and the Database and the future of their combination – the Blockchain. Andrew Keys is Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise. He comes to ConsenSys Enterprise with capital markets, technology and entrepreneurial experience. Previously, he worked for UBS investment bank in equities analysis. Later, he was responsible for the creation and distribution of life settlement products to hedge funds and investment banks. After, he co-founded a revenue cycle manage...
Digital Transformation Blogs
Cloud-enabled transformation has evolved from cost saving measure to business innovation strategy -- one that combines the cloud with cognitive capabilities to drive market disruption. Learn how you can achieve the insight and agility you need to gain a competitive advantage. Industry-acclaimed CTO and cloud expert, Shankar Kalyana presents. Only the most exceptional IBMers are appointed with the rare distinction of IBM Fellow, the highest technical honor in the company. Shankar has also received the prestigious Outstanding Technical Achievement Award three times - an accomplishment befitting ...
Digital transformation has increased the pace of business creating a productivity divide between the technology haves and have nots. Managing financial information on spreadsheets and piecing together insight from numerous disconnected systems is no longer an option. Rapid market changes and aggressive competition are motivating business leaders to reevaluate legacy technology investments in search of modern technologies to achieve greater agility, reduced costs and organizational efficiencies. In this session, learn how today's business leaders are managing finance in the cloud and the essent...
Containers, microservices and DevOps are all the rage lately. You can read about how great they are and how they’ll change your life and the industry everywhere. So naturally when we started a new company and were deciding how to architect our app, we went with microservices, containers and DevOps. About now you’re expecting a story of how everything went so smoothly, we’re now pushing out code ten times a day, but the reality is quite different.
CloudEXPO.TV
"I think DevOps is now a rambunctious teenager – it’s starting to get a mind of its own, wanting to get its own things but it still needs some adult supervision...
"We are still a relatively small software house and we are focusing on certain industries like FinTech, med tech, energy and utilities. We help our customers wi...