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  Think Big – Now Think Even Bigger
  Join Us at Internet of Things at Cloud Expo, November 11-13,
at the Javits Center!


The Internet of Things (IoT) is the most profound change in personal and enterprise IT since the creation of the Worldwide Web more than 20 years ago.

All major researchers estimate there will be tens of billions devices - computers, smartphones, tablets, and sensors - connected to the Internet by 2020. This number will continue to grow at a rapid pace for the next several decades.

With major technology companies and startups seriously embracing IoT strategies, now is the perfect time to attend Internet of Things at Cloud Expo in New York City. Learn what is going on, contribute to the discussions, and ensure that your enterprise is as "IoT-Ready" as it can be!

Delegates to Internet of Things at Cloud Expo will be able to attend eight separate, information-packed tracks:

  • Enterprise Cloud
  • Digital Transformation
  • The API Enterprise | Mobility & Security
  • DevOps | Containers & Microservices
  • Cognitive Computing | AI, ML, DL
  • Big Data | Analytics
  • IoT | IIoT | Smart Cities
  • Hot Topics | FinTech | WebRTC

There are 120 breakout sessions in all, with Keynotes, General Sessions, and Power Panels adding to three days of incredibly rich presentations and content.


We'll see you in New York!



Day 3 Keynote at @ThingsExpo | Chris Matthieu, CTO of Octoblu
In his keynote at @ThingsExpo, Chris Matthieu, Director of IoT Engineering at Citrix and co-founder and CTO of Octoblu, focused on building an IoT platform and company. He provided a behind-the-scenes look at Octoblu's platform, business, and pivots along the way (including the Citrix acquisition of Octoblu).
  Themes & Topics to Be Discussed

Consumer IoT
• Wearables
• Smart Appliances
• Smart Cars
• Smartphones 2.0
• Automation
• Smart Travel
• Personal Fitness
• Health Care
• Personalized Marketing
• Customized Shopping
• Personal Finance
• The Digital Divide
• Mobile Cash & Markets
• Games & The IoT
• The Future of Education
• Virtual Reality

Enterprise IoT
• The Business Case for
x IoT
• Smart Grids
• Smart Cities
• Smart Transportation
• The Smart Home
• M2M
• Authentication/Security
• Wiring the IoT
• The Internet of
x Everything
• Digital Transformation
x of Enterprise IT
• Agriculture
• Transportation
• Manufacturing
• Local & State
x Government
• Federal Government

IoT Developers | WebRTC Summit
• Eclipse Foundation
• Cloud Foundry
• Linux Containers
• Node-Red
• Open Source Hardware
• Ajax and the IoT
• Leveraging SOA
• Multi-Cloud IoT
• Evolving Standards
• WebSockets
• Security & Privacy
x Protocols
• GPS & Proximity
x Services
• Bluetooth/RFID/etc
• XMPP
• Nest Labs



The Top Keynotes, the Best Sessions, a Rock Star Faculty and the Most Qualified Delegates of ANY Internet of Things Event!


The future of computing lies in these things. As computing takes a much more active role in our lives it will at the same time become much more invisible. Internet of Things Expo will address the challenges in getting from where we are today to this future.
 
The high-energy event is a must-attend for senior technologists from CEOs on down – including CIOs, CTOs, directors of infrastructure, VPs of technology, IT directors and managers, network and storage managers, network engineers, enterprise architects, and communications and networking specialists.




@ThingsExpo Power Panel | The World's Many IoTs: Which Are the Most Important?
The Internet of Things is clearly many things: data collection and analytics, wearables, Smart Grids and Smart Cities, the Industrial Internet, and more. Cool platforms like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Intel's Galileo and Edison, and a diverse world of sensors are making the IoT a great toy box for developers in all these areas. In this Power Panel at @ThingsExpo, panelists discussed what things are the most important, which will have the most profound effect on the world, and what should we expect to see over the next couple of years.
Benefits of Attending the Three-Day Technical Program
  LEARNexactly why Internet of Things is relevant today from an economic, business and technology standpoint.
  HEAR first-hand from industry experts the common issues and requirements for creating a platform for the Internet of Things.
  SEE what new tools and approaches the Internet of Things requires.
  DISCOVER how to drive a distributed approach to the Internet of Things, where applications move to the data.
  FIND OUThow the vast volumes of new data produced by the Internet of Things provides a valuable new source of business insight through advanced analytical techniques.
  MASTER how the ongoing development of smart cities, cars, and houses will enhance connectivity infrastructure.
Lunch Power Panel | Microservices & IoT- Moderated by Jason Bloomberg
In this Power Panel at @DevOpsSummit, moderated by Jason Bloomberg, president of Intellyx, panelists Roberto Medrano, Executive Vice President at Akana; Lori MacVittie, Evangelist for F5 Networks; and Troy Topnik, ActiveState's Technical Product Manager; and Otis Gospodnetic, founder of Sematext; peeled away the buzz and discuss the important architectural principles behind implementing IoT solutions for the enterprise. As remote IoT devices and sensors become increasingly intelligent, they become part of our distributed cloud environment, and we must architect and code accordingly. At the very least, you'll have no problem filling in your buzzword bingo cards.


GNOME Viewpoint: Open Letter to Nicholas Petreley - Crack Pipes for Everyone!
GNOME Viewpoint: Open Letter to Nicholas Petreley - Crack Pipes for Everyone!

I stumbled upon this review of GNOME 2.6 by Nicholas Petreley via OSNews.

Now, I'm no self-proclaimed Linux desktop expert, but I consider myself a pretty knowledgeable GNOME user, I even wrote up a review or two that were considered pretty decent. Given the longevity of Nick in this community, I was appalled by the utter disrespect shown in this article. Luckily for us, fools choose emotion over straight facts, so in this entry I will simply refute his comments with facts.

Obviously Mr. Petreley has chosen to outright lie about GNOME and its capabilities, so you can call this an open letter, in which I will happily debate in public, or whatever, since most of what he says, just plain ain't true. Sure, not everyone likes GNOME, and surely everyone has strong opinions about the spatial Nautilus, but misdirection is just dishonest.

Let's start off with this gem:

Each time I get a new version of GNOME, there's this feeling of anticipation and exhilaration -- a feeling that this new version of GNOME can't possibly turn out to be as bad as the last one. But so far, each new version lives down to the same low standards set by the previous one.

Does anyone reading this quote, right off the bat assume that this is going to be a fair review of GNOME whatsoever? I can't even formulate a response to this.

The GNOME file manager, Nautilus, no longer allows users to navigate through folders as one might use a Web browser or Windows Explorer.

Misconception #1. The standard tree view is available by right clicking on a folder and choosing "Browse Folders", via the menu using "Browse Filesystem", or via the panel icon that looks like a file cabinet (it's there by default). So, three seperate methods to access the old view, one of which is even on the panel by default, yet Nicholas, with his years of Linux experience, can't seem to find it, naturally GNOME has robbed him of this ability.

If this sounds familiar, it's because this was the default behavior of Windows 95, OS/2 and early versions of Mac OS.

Windows 95 was never spatial. It was mimicked, poorly. Since Mr. Petreley can't seem to define what spatial is in the first place, and which OS implemented it in which way if at all, we're left with ye olde "Doesn't work like Explorer, it sucks." excuse. There's more to spatial than one folder per window. I'd explain it, but there are plenty of resources available that define this, unfortunately Nicholas failed to comprehend even one of them.

Not even that abomination of operating systems, Windows 95, made users retreat to the registry editor to use a single window to navigate folders.

GConf is nothing like the Windows Registry, except for the similar appearance of their respective editors. If Mr. Petreley cares to compare and contrast GConf and the Windows Registry he would know this. In fact Nicholas, I will paypal you $100 US if you can name three architectural similarities between GConf and the Registry.

Of course, this flaw has nothing to do with the inflexibility of the primitive graphical tool kit upon which GNOME was based.

This is another passage that I can't even comprehend, and isn't worthy of replying to. I'd like to quote it for the record though. Note the lack of evidence when defining "primitive" and "inflexibility". I don't think anyone that has used GTK's language bindings will use the word "inflexible".

GNOME grew out of the desire to free people from Microsoft's ability to dictate what users can or can't do.

Well someone better tell the GNOME developers, I'm pretty sure that they're out to make a kickass free desktop. I suppose you better tell them that they're only purpose isn't to innovate on the desktop, it's to fight Microsoft. Thanks for the tip, I'm sure the GNOME developers will be happy to note that they've been coding for the totally wrong reasons, luckily, you came along to let them know that their purpose is to free people from Microsoft.

Yet GNOME is built on the premise that its developers are so much wiser than users when it comes to navigating folders and setting colors that GNOME users shouldn't have a choice in the matter.

Hmmmm, I must be a moron then. I like spatial Nautilus. Everyone I know who uses GNOME loves the spatial Nautilus, except for two. The other dozen or so dig it. Those that don't like it, shut it off and move on with their lives.

I also have plenty of friends who don't like GNOME at all. But then again, they're not accusing GNOME of living to low standards. If you don't like something, just say you don't like it. Lying about it doesn't help anybody. If you use KDE you feel the same feeling when someone tells you that KDE has a "license problem". Pisses you off doesn't it?

It's ridiculous what they pay people to write articles these days. It's amusing, and heartwarming, that the Arslinux crew writes more in depth, informative, and well regarded content FOR FREE, because we love OSS, than a so-called OSS evangelist. Nicholas Petreley should be ashamed of himself.

About Jorge Castro
Jorge Castro is a late twentysomething computer addict who works at SAIC as a "computer guy." He likes Linux, and many people accuse him of having a bad case of the GNOME and Firebird fever, to the point of lunacy. He helps write Linux.ars when he's not idling in #linux/irc.arstechnica.com. He is also partially responsible for the Ars review of Gnome that came out a while back. He is a former president of MDLUG.

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Reader Feedback: Page 1 of 3

GNOME needs some serious improvements. They need a good menu editor that will work correctly. The system is buggy.

Jorge Castro is absolutly corect! I personally am not married to either gnome or kde however both platforms are good and I appritiate all the hard work that goes into it I think Mr. Petreley needs to go read his Dale Carnegie book again and maybe re write his review.

It's true that more choices generally make for a worse user experience. Jorge could help us all by explaining why the Gnome 2.6 default for Nautilus is a UI paradigm that was abandoned.

What is it about this UI model that makes it good? It beats me, but then usability is a complex subject. How many users tested it? What tasks were people given and how did this compare with the previous behaviour? What were the results and discussion that lead to this being the best UI choice? Simple metrics, simple usability testing and a report on the rational decision making that lead to this choice would have been illuminating. Not rhetoric.

Further, changing the *default* behaviour requires an unusual tool. That's not usually a UI improvement. Jorge sets up a false target and then demolishes it - the challenge was not to change the current behaviour, but the default.

So, in summary, I share Nicholas' frustration. I don't think Jorge made a reasonable case against what Nick said, but against a caricature of Nick's article, making it into a personal attack rather than a rational response.

Long time received Computer World where Mr. Peterly had an article every week. Most of his article raised my blod pressure so I stopped reading the paper all together. I am totaly surprised of the fact that someone with such low grade jurnalizm capability can still be outthere making hear his voice that more people would be happy not to.

stan: Well, if Petrely writes emotional spat, what do you think he should get in return?

all this is pointless dribble, reading this kludge has done nothing but make me bored. If you don't like GNOME don't use it, simple. You all have a choice so stop whining like slashdot kiddiez. Nicolas doesn't seem to really have much of a clue about anything, and to all those out there that look up to him, I'll give you a dollar so you can buy a clue. This KDE vs. GNOME junk is old, Windows vs. Linux, BSD vs Linux, it's all just a waste of time. Nobody really cares, use what you want, use what you like and let others do the same. Stop being little bitches.

This is a poor rebutal to Petrely's opinion article. Jorge begins by telling us that he will provide facts to show why Petrely's opinions are wrong. Instead he provides an emotional spat with few facts and many vauge, even misleading, statements (as pointed out by many commentors already). If this is the best response GNOME has to offer, then Petrely must be right.

I don't understand what the big hooplah is for having buttloads of options everywhere. I for one consider myself somewhat of an expert user, but I don't want to change many options. I want to get work done, not hunt through preference dialogs. I want to go to a different computer and get things done without having to set a gazillion options. I want to install a new system and not have to set many preferences. I want to upgrade stuff without having to set many preferences. I want the documentation to be short concise and readable rather then having to consider all the preferences someone might want to use. An app with fewer preferences and modes of operation really is easier to document and is more likely to be documented and for the documentation to be correct. Yes this all means sometimes learning to live with the defaults even if they aren't exactly what I want them to be. But I don't care, I want to work, not twiddle preferences.

Another thing people don't understand is that if a program has many options, all the use cases are not tested well. There are many untested combinations leading to usability problems in case some option combinations don't make sense, through stability in case some option combinations make things crash to security problems. People completely ignore security. Simplicity leads to better, smaller code base, easier to debug, test and verify. If you consider an expert user as one who likes to twiddle preferences, then yes, GNOME is not for you.

Here's my experience:
The Gnome task bar keeps changing the size of the buttons, even when there's only two of them. I have no clue why.

In Nautilus, if I need to get to a deep directory, and only to that directory, I end up with one window for each directory in the hierarchy. I'm only interested in one of them. Yes, I admit; I can middle-double-click using emulate-3-buttons which means double clicking on the left and right buttons at the same time. If I have two of those hierarchies, and the windows obstructed, in order to raise the relevant windows I have to search through 2*(n+) items. Task grouping in the task bar MUST be enabled, otherwise the task buttons become too small to be usable. That adds one click to the process.

The Nautilus Browser, against basic usability accepted standards, sets its title to "File Browser: ...".

GGV and GPDF keep having this navigate-by-page interface. You scroll to the bottom of page 1, you switch to page 2, you get the bottom of page 2. The down key doesn't switch pages. Can't use those. This has been a problem since I've known these tools.

The terminal is slow and hungry for CPU resources. It used to be faster and more efficient.

The GTK+ file selector used to be quickly navigable using TAB completion (intuitive for the command line fella' at least). Now you have to press CTRL+L to get something similar (intuitive for no one). How does one know? Forums and/or mailing-lists.

These are things that I use over 50% of the time, and never seemed to work right in Gnome. That's not to say there are no good things in Gnome. There are. The problem is that instead of fixing things that don't work, they seem to prioritize coming up with new and radical things that introduce new problems.

Well Personally I dislike spatial nautilus but I love Gnome 2.6. I think 2.6 has a lot of nice improvements and works really well. While I do use browser mode for nautilus 95% of the time there are times when i would rather use spatial mode so while. While there are a few small complaints I do have such as the inability to see hidden folders with the new GTK 2.4, a few small bugs on the gstreamer end, and other various little things here and there I feel Gnome 2.6 was a good release and I greatly look foward to 2.7.x series and helping to test it.

Petrely: Yet GNOME is built on the premise that its developers are so much wiser than users when it comes to navigating folders and setting colors that GNOME users shouldn't have a choice in the matter.

Castro:Hmmmm, I must be a moron then. I like spatial Nautilus. Everyone I know who uses GNOME loves the spatial Nautilus, except for two. The other dozen or so dig it. Those that don't like it, shut it off and move on with their lives.

Me: Umm...the fact is you did not address his complaint. The fact is, "GNOME" decided to use Epiphany because it adhered more stringently to the usability guidelines which today seem to say "Dont offer customization through the UI". You know what?....Petrely is right. Taking all of the options out of the UI is clearly telling us all that the developers know better than we do. I want my options. And yes, I can make most changes from the command line. But why make me STFW for all the options and combinations? Why not just put an 'Advanced' button that will show more config options? Doesnt make sense. The more apps that go the way of epiphany the more Gnome desktop becomes a toy.

Its easy to say that "i dont like this option", so i'm not going to use gnome, poke your tounge out and run away..

I find lots of things "i dont like", but just deal with it. Gnome has a different philisopy than other "window managers", simplicity and clarity.

If you feel as though you know better, join the team and explain your feelings. You dont have to be be a coder to help.

Spatial nautilus is actually more efficient. The problem isn't with spatial nautilus, it's with people's expectations. The people that are having a problem with the spatial nautilus are used to doing things the Windows way. This is not just me talking. They have actually done usability studies and found that Gnome was easier for people to use because it wasn't trying to emulate Windows at every step in the road.

The next problem is the idea that spatial nautilus is being done on an incomplete file system, that not all of Gnome has readily adopted the concept of spatial. And that's true. However, I think it's completely unfair that you can expect the entire Gnome developer community to completely revamp the entire desktop (and ALL the applications) in a matter of only 6 months. It's the first step, and I for one am happy they took that step.

Next: Nick act's like some great harm has been inflicted on him. Now, I am not saying it's wrong to disagree (I moan about certain aspects about Gnome myself); however, he's not offering anything more than a troll would. The Gnome project isn't about building Nick his perfect desktop. It's about building the best desktop the Gnome developers can think to make. And you know what? They have to try things. New things. I find the same people complaining about spatial nautilus are the same type of people that complain that Linux DE's are just copying. So they will complain no matter what.

Finally, concerning all the insane amounts of options people want on their desktop. What about the option not to have all those damn options? I for one prefer a desktop that works to make itself usable by default. I don't want to spend hours having to customize every inane detail.

I always find it funny people saying Gnome is for the newbies and KDE is for the power users. I actually think it would be the opposite. Of course, I define power user as someone who actually wants to be productive, rather than someone who wants to spend five hours changing his font size in every single application.

Nick might be arrogant, but he's pretty right. I've used Gnome since the 0.58 days, and every time there's a new release its basically the previous release recoded again because they can never get it right. Gnome is basically on par with Win3.11. After years of waiting for a completed release I finally gave up and went to decent operating system.

[quote]
Misconception #1. The standard tree view is available by right clicking on a folder and choosing "Browse Folders", via the menu using "Browse Filesystem", or via the panel icon that looks like a file cabinet (it's there by default).
[/quote]

Of course, it is immediately obvious to someone with a folder open that "Browse" is somehow different than what they're doing already...

... on second thought, I'd have to say not.

I don't personally object that much to spatial Nautilus (at least, not enough to spend the time to turn it off, since I spend most of my time in a GUI-modded Konqueror anyway), but in my more cynical moods it really does seem like the Nautilus developers decided to go on a crusade to "convert the unrighteous" by making it too hard to get back to the old behavior.

Yes, I do know about GConf, but I don't use Nautilus enough to care. And while I agree that architecturally GConf is much more intelligent than the Windows Registry, GConf-Editor still has enough similarity to regedit that it can occasionally make me twitch.

[quote]
I don't think anyone that has used GTK's language bindings will use the word "inflexible".
[/quote]

I've used the C bindings and consider myself scarred for life. GTKmm and GTK# are tolerable, barely, but GTK+'s native form... is hideous. The only thing it has going for it is binary compatibility. (Which is not to be scoffed at, but compiler ABI's don't change that often, and C++ just makes things _so_ much more pleasent. And I _like_ having my signals autogenerated rather than having to manually call a function to create each one...) The GObject model, while a reasonable attempt to build an RTTI-capable object model in a language that makes no effort to support it, is still IMHO at best an effective hack. There are parts of the greater GTK+ family that I like (though I'd like them a lot more if they didn't use GObjects... but then they wouldn't be GTK+-ish) like Pango and GStreamer, but again I usually find GObjects to be too much of a pain to make them worthwhile. I'm just really glad that Cairo is too low-level to have been GObjectificated.

[quote]
Hmmmm, I must be a moron then. I like spatial Nautilus. Everyone I know who uses GNOME loves the spatial Nautilus, except for two. The other dozen or so dig it.
[/quote]

Fifteen people doth not a statistical sample make. Especially not such a self-selecting group as "my friends" or even "people I know well enough to know that they love spatial Nautilus."


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